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Home > Parenting Information > Baby Development > Month 7 to 9

 

Baby Development
Month 7 to 9
" What to expect from your 7 to 9 month old "

 

<< Month 4 to 6

>> Month 10 to 12

   

Month 7

Most babies should be able to . . .

  • Sit without support

  • Make razzing sounds

  • Imitate sound

  • Work at getting a toy that is out of reach

  • Feed self a cracker or finger food

Some babies will probably be able to . . .

  • Start crawling or lunging forward

  • Get upset if you take a toy away

  • Play peek-a-boo

  • Distinguish emotions by your tone of voice

  • Pass object from one hand to the other

  • Separation and stranger anxiety may begin

Some babies could possibly be able to . . .

  • Stand while holding onto something

  • Wave goodbye

  • Clap hands

  • Bang objects together

  • Say mama or dada

  • Pull up to standing position from sitting

  • Walk holding onto furniture

 

Month 8

Most babies should be able to . . .

  • Start crawling

  • Sit without support

  • Pass object from one hand to the other

  • Respond to own name

  • Mouth and chew on objects

  • Reach for spoon when being fed

  • Turn away when finished eating

  • Say mama and dada to both parents (usually isn’t specific)

Some babies will probably be able to . . .

  • Stand while holding on to something

  • Crawl well

  • Pull up to standing position from sitting

  • Walk holding onto furniture

  • Clap and bang objects together

  • Separation and stranger anxiety may begin

Some babies could possibly be able to . . .

  • Indicate wants with different gestures

  • Use thumb and finger pincer grasp to pick things up

  • Stand alone momentarily

  • Wave goodbye

  • Understand the word no (but usually doesn’t obey it)

 

Month 9

Most babies should be able to . . .

  • Stand while holding on to something

  • Look for dropped objects

  • Pull up to standing position from sitting

  • Clap and bang objects together

  • Combine syllables into word like sounds

  • Separation and stranger anxiety may begin

Some babies will probably be able to . . .

  • Use thumb and finger pincer grasp to pick things up

  • Walk holding onto furniture

  • Stand alone momentarily

  • Wave goodbye

  • Drop object and then looks for them

  • Understand the word no (but usually doesn’t obey it)

  • Begin to identify self in a mirror

Some babies could possibly be able to . . .

  • Say mama and dada to the right parents

  • Play patty cake

  • Play ball

  • Drink from a cup independently

  • Stand alone well

  • Say one word other than mama or dada

<< Month 4 to 6

>> Month 10 to 12

 

 

 

Please note that these are only general developmental guidelines for an average healthy child. A healthy child may reach a developmental milestone earlier or later than the average shown in these guidelines. Each child develops differently and just because a child may appear to be behind in one developmental area does not mean there is something wrong. If you feel your child is behind in several areas of development, contact your pediatrician for advice.

 

 

 

 

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